Farid Bogdalov

Farid Bogdalov

The creative method of Farid Bogdalov was formed in the late 80s, early 90s. The artist received academic training at the painting department of the Surikovsky Institute, and joined the problems of contemporary art in the art squat of Furmanny Lane and Chistoprudny Boulevard. Strictly speaking, he was a pioneer of artist's workshop at Furmanny and the organizer of both squats. These legendary Moscow addresses were real centers of contemporary culture, where an extremely intensive exchange of creative energy took place and an indomitable process of the formation of new art languages ​​was going on. It was then and there that the Moscow artist, originally from Lukhovitsy near Moscow, confidently took the direction to the development and continuous improvement of plastic posonceptualism, which takes the form of abstract simulationism, or ironic figurativism. Of particular interest to Farid Bogdalov is the analysis of the widest visual contexts of modern civilization and society, which is described as “the society of the spectacle” primarily. These are the ways of representing political and economic power, and the omnipresent visual traps of the system of total consumption. The artist likens the sweet baits of frantic fakes to a cake, the cream of which attracts a fly to itself. However, depicting a fly on a cake, the artist deprives the image of the original attractiveness, changing it for the triumph of spectator irony. In his new series, Sweet Power, the original power of images borrowed from mass visual culture (advertising, the Internet, etc.) competes with the power of reflective art, whose main weapon – analysis, irony and paradox. Seemingly simple-minded, full of light humor and soft absurdity compositions are actually not so simple and straightforward. Various objects, books, dumbbells, beer mugs, sports equipment, toy monsters, combined with sugary creams and ice cream, turn into objectified metaphors of force that suggest reflections on the nature of power as such and its varieties – the power of knowledge, sport, wealth and strength of the powerful. But there are also reflections on the notorious power of art and the nature of artistic taste. Will art choke in a cloying totality or is it able to counter some kind of invisible saving irony to cream images?

 

George Litichevsky